The Michigan Engineer News Center

UMich continues community education outreach during COVID-19 lockdown

The University of Michigan Aerospace Engineering Department is offering a series of online educational resources to help teachers keep kids motivated while learning at home.| Short Read

UMich’s annual Aerospace Day is a very popular event where kids are introduced to aerospace engineering by a way of presentations and fun hands-on projects. Unfortunately, the current COVID-19 pandemic forced the cancellation of this year’s Aerospace Day, but not the spirit that sustains the event.

EnlargeAerospace Department virtual outreach online seminars
IMAGE:  Aerospace Department is offering one-hour online seminars conducted by volunteer faculty and student organizations as well as at-home projects and aimed primarily at high school students as an alternative to simple videos.

As a substitute, the Aerospace Department is offering one-hour online seminars conducted by volunteer faculty and student organizations as well as at-home projects and aimed primarily at high school students as an alternative to simple videos. These are being provided not only to Ann Arbor schools but also to Detroit, Dowagiac, and Escanaba. 

The presentations are based on the polling of teachers to learn their students’ needs and will be provided through mid-June and even into the Fall and Winter terms if required

If you are a department alumnus who wishes to participate or want more information, contact the organizer of the program, Outreach Specialist Kimberly Johnson (berlykim@umich.edu).

Aerospace Department virtual outreach online seminars
Portrait of Kim Johnson

Contact

Kimberly Johnson
Communications Manager

Aerospace Engineering

(734) 647-4701

3054 FXB

The electrons absorb laser light and set up “momentum combs” (the hills) spanning the energy valleys within the material (the red line). When the electrons have an energy allowed by the quantum mechanical structure of the material—and also touch the edge of the valley—they emit light. This is why some teeth of the combs are bright and some are dark. By measuring the emitted light and precisely locating its source, the research mapped out the energy valleys in a 2D crystal of tungsten diselenide. Credit: Markus Borsch, Quantum Science Theory Lab, University of Michigan.

Mapping quantum structures with light to unlock their capabilities

Rather than installing new “2D” semiconductors in devices to see what they can do, this new method puts them through their paces with lasers and light detectors. | Medium Read