The Michigan Engineer News Center

Maki to take over as Director of Marine Hydro Lab

Effective June 1, 2020, Richard B. Couch Development Professor of Marine Hydrodynamics Kevin Maki will take over as Director for the Aaron Friedman Marine Hydrodynamics Lab. | Short Read
EnlargeKevin J Maki, Director, Aaron Friedman Marine Hydrodynamics Lab, Department of Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering
IMAGE:  Kevin J Maki, Director, Aaron Friedman Marine Hydrodynamics Lab, Department of Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering

After more than three years of dedicated and passionate service, Julie Young has decided to move on to focus on research, teaching, and services that are important to the overall mission and scholarship profile of the department.

Taking the helm will be Kevin J. Maki, who has made excellent contributions to the department and to hydrodynamics research with his scholarship, teaching, and professional activities.

Dr. James Gose, who has been serving in the role of acting director during the leadership transition, will take over as Associate Director effective June 1, as well.

Of the change Department Chair Jing Sun says, “I look forward to working with Kevin and Jimmy in their new capacities, as well as with the rest of the team to advance the research, education, and service missions of MHL and the department.”

Kevin J Maki, Director, Aaron Friedman Marine Hydrodynamics Lab, Department of Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering
Portrait of Nicole Panyard

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Nicole Frawley-Panyard
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Naval Architecture & Marine Engineering

(734) 936-0567

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Researchers
  • Kevin J.  Maki

    Kevin J. Maki

    Richard B. Couch Development Professor of Marine Hydrodynamics

  • Jase Gose

    Jase Gose

    Associate Director, Aaron Friedman Marine Hydrodynamics Lab

The electrons absorb laser light and set up “momentum combs” (the hills) spanning the energy valleys within the material (the red line). When the electrons have an energy allowed by the quantum mechanical structure of the material—and also touch the edge of the valley—they emit light. This is why some teeth of the combs are bright and some are dark. By measuring the emitted light and precisely locating its source, the research mapped out the energy valleys in a 2D crystal of tungsten diselenide. Credit: Markus Borsch, Quantum Science Theory Lab, University of Michigan.

Mapping quantum structures with light to unlock their capabilities

Rather than installing new “2D” semiconductors in devices to see what they can do, this new method puts them through their paces with lasers and light detectors. | Medium Read