The Michigan Engineer News Center

Assistant Professor Evgueni Filipov receives 2019 ASCE Best Paper Award

CEE Assistant Professor Evgueni Filipov and his co-authors have received an award recognizing their outstanding contributions to the field of analysis and computation in structural engineering. | Short Read
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IMAGE:  Portrait of Evgueni Filipov

CEE Assistant Professor Evgueni Filipov and his co-authors received the American Society of Civil Engineers’ 2019 award for Best Journal Paper in Analysis & Computation for their paper “Deployable Sandwich Surfaces with High Out-of-Plane Stiffness” published in ASCE’s Journal of Structural Engineering. The paper presents a set of deployable origami tube structures that can create smooth functional surfaces while simultaneously maintaining a high out-of-plane stiffness both during and after deployment.

Filipov’s research interests are in the field of deployable and reconfigurable structural systems. His focus is on folding and adaptable structures based on the principles of origami that can have practical applications ranging in scale and discipline from biomedical robotics to deployable architecture. He is also interested in developing analytical tools that can simulate mechanical and multi-physical phenomena of deployable structures. Filipov researches the design and manufacturing of deployable structures using 3D printing and other fabrication techniques. He is also exploring large-scale folding systems, where thick panels are connected with hinges and are deployed by mechanical devices.

Filipov is a member of ASCE and has won numerous awards throughout his career such as a 2020 National Science Foundation (NSF) CAREER Award and a 2018 DARPA Young Faculty Award.

Evgueni Filipov
Jessica Petras

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Researchers
  • Evgueni Filipov

    Evgueni Filipov

    Assistant Professor of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Jay Guo holds a sheet of flexible transparent conductor on the University of Michigan’s College of Engineering North Campus. The material sandwiches a thin layer of silver between two “dielectric” materials, aluminum oxide and zinc oxide, producing a conductive anti-reflection coating on the sheet of plastic.

Making plastic more transparent while also adding electrical conductivity

Michigan Engineers change the game by making a conductive coating that’s also anti-reflective. | Medium Read