The Michigan Engineer News Center

Professor Panagou receives National Science Foundation Faculty Early Career Development Award

Congratulations to Professor Dimitra Panagou, who received a National Science Foundation Faculty Early Career Development Award for her work in autonomy | Short Read
EnlargePortrait of AERO Assistant Professor Dimitra Panagou. Photo: Joseph Xu, Michigan Engineering.
IMAGE:  AERO Assistant Professor Dimitra Panagou. Photo: Joseph Xu, Michigan Engineering.

The Aerospace Department congratulates Professor Dimitra Panagou, who received a National Science Foundation Faculty Early Career Development Award for her work in control theory for multi-agent systems with applications in safety-critical and time-critical aerospace and robotics systems. NSF CAREER awards are not discipline specific, but are awarded to faculty who “have the potential to serve as academic role models in research and education.” 

Professor Panagou’s research covers a wide range of problems associated with control of autonomous systems, including non-linear systems, multi-agent systems, and constrained decision making. The CAREER grant, which is meant to support a five-year research campaign, is focused on the problem of perceivability: the ability of a system to dynamically gather knowledge about an environment. Applications of this research include drones and self driving cars, which must perceive their environment accurately and quickly in order to safely interact with humans. The grant also incorporates an outreach program to engage K-12 students.  

Enlarge
IMAGE:  Firefly Hexacopter, one of several vehicles used in Prof. Panagou's DASC Lab

Professor Panagou’s research covers a wide range of problems associated with control of autonomous systems, including non-linear systems, multi-agent systems, and constrained decision making. The CAREER grant, which is meant to support a five-year research campaign, is focused on the problem of perceivability: the ability of a system to dynamically gather knowledge about an environment. Applications of this research include drones and self driving cars, which must perceive their environment accurately and quickly in order to safely interact with humans. The grant also incorporates an outreach program to engage K-12 students.  

The project will complement Professor Panagou’s research program on control and estimation of multi-agent systems and her other projects on human-robot interaction for space exploration, on adversarially-robust multi-vehicle teams, and on spatiotemporal mission synthesis under uncertainty.  

Portrait of AERO Assistant Professor Dimitra Panagou. Photo: Joseph Xu, Michigan Engineering.
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