The Michigan Engineer News Center

Three CLASP faculty to receive College of Engineering awards

Awards will be presented at the Faculty Honors Dinner Dance in March. | Short Read

Three Climate & Space faculty have been selected by the U-M College of Engineering Honors and Awards Committee to receive awards for their outstanding performance during the past year.

EnlargeArthur F. Thurnau Prof. Mark Moldwin
IMAGE:  Arthur F. Thurnau Prof. Mark Moldwin

 

  • Arthur F. Thurnau Professor Mark Moldwin will receive the 2019-2020 Trudy Huebner Service Excellence Award. 
    This award is given to faculty who have “…demonstrated significant service contribution at the College and/or University levels.”

 

 

 

 

EnlargeHenry S. Carhart Collegiate Professor Emeritus R. Paul Drake
IMAGE:  Henry S. Carhart Collegiate Professor Emeritus R. Paul Drake

 

  • Henry S. Carhart Collegiate Professor Emeritus R. Paul Drake will receive the 2019-2020 H. Scott Fogler Award for Professional Leadership and Service. 
    This award is given to faculty who demonstrate “…significant national or international impact on the field of engineering through leadership or service external to the College of Engineering.”

 

 

 

 

EnlargeResearch Prof. Ward "Chip" Manchester
IMAGE:  Research Prof. Ward "Chip" Manchester

 

  • Research Professor Ward “Chip” Manchester will receive the 2019-2020 Kenneth M. Reese Outstanding Research Scientist Award.
    This award is given to research faculty who have “…demonstrated sustained excellence in research and related scholarly activities.”

 

 

The awards will be presented at the Faculty Honors Dinner Dance on Saturday, March 21st at the Michigan League.

Congratulations, all! 

Arthur F. Thurnau Prof. Mark Moldwin
Henry S. Carhart Collegiate Professor Emeritus R. Paul Drake
Research Prof. Ward
Portrait of EJ Olsen

Contact

EJ Olsen
Marketing Communications Specialist

Climate and Space Sciences and Engineering

(734) 548-3204

2239 SRB

The electrons absorb laser light and set up “momentum combs” (the hills) spanning the energy valleys within the material (the red line). When the electrons have an energy allowed by the quantum mechanical structure of the material—and also touch the edge of the valley—they emit light. This is why some teeth of the combs are bright and some are dark. By measuring the emitted light and precisely locating its source, the research mapped out the energy valleys in a 2D crystal of tungsten diselenide. Credit: Markus Borsch, Quantum Science Theory Lab, University of Michigan.

Mapping quantum structures with light to unlock their capabilities

Rather than installing new “2D” semiconductors in devices to see what they can do, this new method puts them through their paces with lasers and light detectors. | Medium Read