The Michigan Engineer News Center

Bryan Goldsmith named Dow Corning Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering

This support will enable his research lab to explore promising ideas related to machine learning and catalysis.| Short Read
EnlargeBryan R. Goldsmith, Dow Corning Assistant Professor
IMAGE:  Bryan R. Goldsmith, Dow Corning Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering

Bryan R. Goldsmith has been named the Dow Corning Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering. He came to the University of Michigan in 2017 after completing a Humboldt postdoctoral fellowship at the Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society in Berlin, Germany. He received his PhD in Chemical Engineering from the University of California Santa Barbara in 2015. Goldsmith’s research lab specializes in computational modeling to understand and design catalysts and materials for energy generation and storage, pollution reduction, and sustainable chemical conversion.

Regarding this honor, Goldsmith says, “I thank the Dow Chemical Company Foundation for their generous support of my research and teaching goals. Their support will enable my research group to explore promising ideas related to machine learning and catalysis, present our technical findings at leading conferences around the world, and sponsor visiting undergraduate researchers.”

Bryan R. Goldsmith, Dow Corning Assistant Professor
The electrons absorb laser light and set up “momentum combs” (the hills) spanning the energy valleys within the material (the red line). When the electrons have an energy allowed by the quantum mechanical structure of the material—and also touch the edge of the valley—they emit light. This is why some teeth of the combs are bright and some are dark. By measuring the emitted light and precisely locating its source, the research mapped out the energy valleys in a 2D crystal of tungsten diselenide. Credit: Markus Borsch, Quantum Science Theory Lab, University of Michigan.

Mapping quantum structures with light to unlock their capabilities

Rather than installing new “2D” semiconductors in devices to see what they can do, this new method puts them through their paces with lasers and light detectors. | Medium Read