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Best Presentation Award given to NERS Ph.D. Candidate Jinpu Lin

Jinpu won with his poster “Scaling Relativistic Laser‐solid Interaction Using Ultrashort Laser Pulses.”| Short Read
Enlargestudent explains poster
IMAGE:  Jinpu Lin

U-M Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences (NERS) Ph.D. candidate Jinpu Lin won Best Presentation Award at the Michigan Institute for Plasma Science and Engineering (MIPSE) 10th Annual Graduate Student Symposium. His poster, titled “Scaling Relativistic Laser‐solid Interaction Using Ultrashort Laser Pulses,” was among five winners chosen at the November 13th symposium. 

Jinpu said that his poster “shows that short-pulse laser solid interaction can produce attosecond electron bunches with experiments and simulation/theory. It also suggests that attosecond electron bunches favor larger incidence angle of the driving laser, as well as moderately sharp preplasma condition.”

This award genuinely encourages me to pursue my career with passion.Jinpu Lin

On winning best poster, Jinpu said, “I feel honored and excited to be acknowledged by a group of specialists in MIPSE. I am proud that our work is making a positive impact and has gained recognition in the field, and I appreciate all the effort and contribution of my co-authors. This award genuinely encourages me to pursue my career with passion.”

Jinpu received a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from Shanghai Jiaotong University and a B.S. in Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences from U-M. Besides being a current Ph.D. candidate at NERS, he is also working towards an M.S. in Electrical Engineering and a graduate certificate in Plasma Science and Engineering from MIPSE. His research interests include short-pulse laser-solid interaction, high-order-harmonic generation, plasma wakefield accelerators, and ultrafast mid-infrared laser techniques.

Congratulations, Jinpu!

student explains poster
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Sara Norman

Michigan Engineering

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