The Michigan Engineer News Center

Xiuli Chao and Brian Denton elected as INFORMS Fellows

U-M IOE’s Xiuli Chao and Brian Denton have been elected as INFORMS fellows for the class of 2019.| Short Read

U-M Industrial and Operations Engineering (IOE) professors Xiuli Chao and Brian Denton have been elected as 2019 INFORMS fellows. 

Each year, INFORMS elects several fellows in order to recognize their exceptional accomplishments and the significant contributions they made to the advancement of operations research and the management sciences over a period of time. 

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IMAGE:  From left: Brian Denton and Xiuli Chao at the INFORMS annual meeting in Seattle.

Chao’s research interests include queueing, scheduling, financial engineering, inventory control and supply chain management. His current research includes work on data-driven optimization of online retailing, and a project focused on improving the efficiencies of sharing economy through enhanced matching and contract design. In addition, he is currently working on a National Science Foundation (NSF) project titled “Learning algorithms for dynamic inventory and pricing optimization problems.”

Brian Denton is the current chair of U-M IOE. His research is focused on applied optimization with applications to medicine, such as using new biomarkers, imaging and other kinds of technology for early detection and treatment of chronic diseases, specifically cancer and cardiovascular disease. 

INFORMS is the world’s largest professional association dedicated to and promoting the best practices and advances in operations research, management science and analytics to improve operational processes, decision-making and outcomes. 

Eight other current U-M IOE faculty members have been previously recognized as INFORMS fellows.

Researchers
  • Xiuli Chao

    Xiuli Chao

    Professor of Industrial and Operations Engineering

  • Brian Denton

    Brian Denton

    Professor and Chair of Industrial and Operations Engineering

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