The Michigan Engineer News Center

Jon Lee selected for Centre de Recherches Mathématiques Scholar-in-Residence Program

U-M IOE's Jon Lee, has been selected as a Simons CRM Professor by The Centre de Recherches Mathématiques (CRM).| Short Read

Jon Lee, G. Lawton and Louise G. Johnson Professor of Engineering in the Department of Industrial and Operations Engineering, was recently selected as a Simons CRM Professor by The Centre de Recherches Mathématiques (CRM), based in Montréal, as part of the Simons CRM Scholar-in-Residence Program.

Lee will hold the title for the duration of his visit to Polytechnique Montréal for a month-long thematic program on mixed-integer nonlinear optimization in October of this year.

“I am honored to be selected and very excited to have the opportunity to participate in the activities planned on mixed-integer nonlinear optimization at Montréal,” said Lee. “It is rewarding to see that the CRM and the Simons Foundation are recognizing and nurturing this field of applied mathematics that I have been involved in for many years.”

"I am honored to be selected and very excited to have the opportunity to participate in the activities planned on mixed-integer nonlinear optimization at Montréal.”Jon Lee, Professor, U-M Industrial & Operations Engineering

CRM’s scholar-in-residence program is directed towards exceptional researchers in mathematics. Simons CRM Scholars are selected to enhance the research activities held by CRM. During his visit, Lee’s role will involve participating in and contributing to CRM thematic programs and the collaborative research activities of the thirteen CRM research laboratories.

CRM is a mathematical research institute in Canada and a major international hub for the mathematical sciences. It offers scientific workshops and outreach activities, hosts 1,500 annual visiting scientists from around the world, and includes thirteen laboratories directly involving more than 200 researchers from twelve major universities in Quebec and Ontario. The Simons Foundation funds research in mathematics and the basic sciences.

Researchers
  • Jon Lee

    Jon Lee

    G. Lawton and Louise G. Johnson Professor of Industrial and Operations Engineering

The electrons absorb laser light and set up “momentum combs” (the hills) spanning the energy valleys within the material (the red line). When the electrons have an energy allowed by the quantum mechanical structure of the material—and also touch the edge of the valley—they emit light. This is why some teeth of the combs are bright and some are dark. By measuring the emitted light and precisely locating its source, the research mapped out the energy valleys in a 2D crystal of tungsten diselenide. Credit: Markus Borsch, Quantum Science Theory Lab, University of Michigan.

Mapping quantum structures with light to unlock their capabilities

Rather than installing new “2D” semiconductors in devices to see what they can do, this new method puts them through their paces with lasers and light detectors. | Medium Read