The Michigan Engineer News Center

Climate & Space faculty are editors of new series of volumes on atmospheric chemistry

The Advances in Atmospheric Chemistry series presents authoritative invited summaries of research on atmospheric chemistry in a changing world. | Short Read
EnlargeProf. Emeritus John Barker; Prof. Allison Steiner; Adjunct Prof. Tim Wallington
IMAGE:  (l-r) Prof. Emeritus John Barker; Prof. Allison Steiner; Adjunct Prof. Tim Wallington

Prof. Emeritus John Barker, along with Prof, Allison Steiner and Adjunct Prof. Tim Wallington, are editors of Advances in Atmospheric Chemistry, Volume 2: Organic Oxidation and Multiphase Chemistry, the second in a planned multi-volume series. The series is a compendium of invited summaries of current trends and advancements in research on atmospheric chemistry.

From the author’s description:“These [summaries] range from comprehensive reviews of major subject areas to focused accounts by individual research groups. The topics are tied to the important societal issues of air quality, stratospheric ozone depletion, acid deposition, the environmental fate of toxics, and climate change. By gathering these new Advances in one series, we aim to catalyze communication among the many researchers who are studying our changing, contemporary atmosphere.

Volume 2 topics include laboratory studies, field measurements, in situ monitoring and remote sensing, studies of composition, chemical modeling, theories of atmospheric chemistry and climate, feedback mechanisms, and the links between atmospheric chemistry and the climate system at large. Chapters describe research on multiphase chemistry affecting air quality in China, multiphase chemistry of organic compounds leading to secondary organic aerosol formation, biogeochemical cycles involving ammonia, oxidation of aromatic compounds, and other relevant subjects.

In addition to this, Prof. Wallington and Prof. Barker along with co-author Prof. john Seinfeld of Cal Tech have contributed a chapter describing “100 Years of Progress in Gas-Phase Atmospheric Chemistry Research” to the forthcoming AMS Centennial Monograph, a volume celebrating the 100 year anniversary of the founding of the American Meteorological Society.

Prof. Emeritus John Barker; Prof. Allison Steiner; Adjunct Prof. Tim Wallington
MORPHEUS blocks potential attacks by encrypting and randomly reshuffling key bits of its own code and data twenty times per second. Getty Images.

New chip stops hacks before they start

MORPHEUS can encrypt and reshuffle code thousands of times faster than human and electronic hackers. | Medium Read