The Michigan Engineer News Center

Associate Professor SangHyun Lee receives 2018 Journal of Computing in Civil Engineering Best Paper Award

CEE Associate Professor SangHyun Lee and his co-authors have received an award recognizing their outstanding contributions to the field of computing in civil engineering.| Short Read

CEE Associate Professor SangHyun Lee and his co-authors received the Journal of Computing in Civil Engineering (JCCE) Best Paper Award for their paper “Recognizing Diverse Construction Activities in Site Images via Relevance Networks of Construction-Related Objects Detected by Convolutional Neural Networks” published in ASCE’s Journal of Computing in Civil Engineering. This award is presented to authors of an outstanding paper published in the Journal of Computing in Civil Engineering during the previous year.

Two of the co-authors, JoonOh Seo and Xiaochun Luo, have a connection to University of Michigan. Seo received his PhD from the University of Michigan and was one of Lee’s former students. He is currently an assistant professor at Hong Kong Polytechnic University. Luo was a former visiting scholar at the University of Michigan and is currently a senior research fellow at Hong Kong Polytechnic University. All three individuals are invited to the 2019 ASCE International Conference on Computing in Civil Engineering in June to receive their award.

Congratulations to all of the authors!

EnlargeFour people standing, two holding certificates
IMAGE:  Xiaochun Luo (far left) and SangHyun Lee (far right) receive their award at the 2019 ASCE International Conference on Computing in Civil Engineering
Four people standing, two holding certificates
Jessica Petras

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Researchers
  • SangHyun Lee

    SangHyun Lee

    Associate Professor & John L. Tishman CM Faculty Scholar of Civil and Environmental Engineering

The electrons absorb laser light and set up “momentum combs” (the hills) spanning the energy valleys within the material (the red line). When the electrons have an energy allowed by the quantum mechanical structure of the material—and also touch the edge of the valley—they emit light. This is why some teeth of the combs are bright and some are dark. By measuring the emitted light and precisely locating its source, the research mapped out the energy valleys in a 2D crystal of tungsten diselenide. Credit: Markus Borsch, Quantum Science Theory Lab, University of Michigan.

Mapping quantum structures with light to unlock their capabilities

Rather than installing new “2D” semiconductors in devices to see what they can do, this new method puts them through their paces with lasers and light detectors. | Medium Read