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Prof. Margaret Kivelson receives the Gold Medal in Geophysics from Royal Astronomical Society

“Astronomy and geophysics are disciplines led by an extraordinarily talented group of people. The Royal Astronomical Society recognises the achievements of the very best of these men and women with our medals and awards."| Short Read

Climate & Space Professor Margaret G. Kivelson has been awarded the Gold Medal in Geophysics by the Royal Astronomical Society (RAS) for a lifetime of outstanding achievement in understanding planetary magnetospheres and their connections to the planets they surround.

The announcements were made at the Ordinary Meeting of the RAS held on Friday, January 11, 2019. The awards will be presented at the National Astronomy Meeting at the University of Lancaster (UK) in July.

The Gold Medal is the Royal Astronomical Society’s highest honor. The medal can be awarded for any reason, but is usually presented in recognition of lifetime achievement. Past winners include Albert Einstein, Edwin Hubble, Arthur Eddington, and Stephen Hawking. It was first awarded in 1824, and since 1964 two have been awarded each year: one for astronomy, and one for geophysics.

Professor Mike Cruise, President of the Royal Astronomical Society, said:

“Astronomy and geophysics are disciplines led by an extraordinarily talented group of people. The Royal Astronomical Society recognises the achievements of the very best of these men and women with our medals and awards. Our prizes are won by researchers at all stages of their careers, studying the core of the Earth, the distant universe, and everything in between. My congratulations to them all!”

Read the full release from the Royal Astronomical Society: https://ras.ac.uk/news-and-press/news/leading-astronomers-and-geophysicists-honoured-royal-astronomical-society

Congratulations, Prof. Kivelson! 

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