The Michigan Engineer News Center

CEE faculty and students attend TRB’s Annual Meeting

CEE faculty and students traveled to Washington D.C. to learn about innovations in mobility. | Short Read

University of Michigan Civil and Environmental Engineering faculty and students attended the Transportation Research Board’s (TRB) 98th Annual Meeting in Washington D.C. on January 13–17, 2019.

A reception was hosted by U-M Civil and Environmental Engineering, UMTRI, Mcity and the Center for Connected and Automated Transportation at U-M to kick off the TRB’s Annual Meeting. At this reception, industry leaders and alumni joined experts from the University of Michigan for an evening of networking and learning more about U-M’s research, partnerships, and collaborations.

  • CEE students and faculty at TRB's annual meeting
  • Reception held by CEE department during the TRB annual meeting.
  • CEE students at reception
  • Conversations at the reception
  • All smiles at the reception
  • Coversations and networking at the CEE reception.

The TRB Annual Meeting attracts more than 13,000 transportation professionals from around the world. This year’s program covered all transportation modes, with more than 5,000 presentations in nearly 800 sessions and workshops, addressing topics of interest to policy makers, administrators, practitioners, researchers, and representatives of government, industry, and academic institution. The spotlight theme for the 2019 meeting was “Transportation for a Smart, Sustainable, and Equitable Future.”

The mission of the TRB is to promote innovation and progress in transportation through research. TRB facilitates the sharing of information on transportation practice and policy by researchers and practitioners, stimulates research, provides expert advice on transportation policy and programs, and disseminates research results broadly and encourages their implementation.

Jessica Petras

Contact

Jessica Petras
Marketing Communications Specialist

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

(734) 764-9876

GG Brown 2105E

An aerosol can sprays into the air against a black background

How a spray from the hardware store could improve nuclear fusion

A coating of polyurethane keeps plasma problems in check during magnetic compression. | Medium Read