The Michigan Engineer News Center

PhD student Ahmed Abdelhady selected for Rackham International Student Fellowship

Ahmed Abdelhady received a Rackham Graduate School fellowship that assists outstanding international students in their studies.| Short Read
EnlargeAhmed Abdelhady
IMAGE:  Ahmed Abdelhady

Civil and Environmental Engineering PhD student, Ahmed Abdelhady, was selected by the Rackham Graduate School to receive the Rackham International Student Fellowship based on his strong academic record, making good progress towards his degree, and his outstanding academic and professional promise. The recipients receive an award to be used as a stipend or as tuition.

The Rackham International Student Fellowship is a highly competitive graduate fellowship where any Rackham program on the Ann Arbor campus may nominate up to two international graduate students who have successfully completed one year of graduate study and are in good academic standing as a master’s or precandidate student.

Abdelhady’s research is on developing a versatile software that can evaluate community resilience for communities subjected to extreme wind hazards (both hurricane winds and tornado winds). The software will be able to model the built environment and the supporting infrastructure. This will allow the calculation of the economic impact and cost of losses of natural hazards. The software will give an insight into how communities behave and respond to extreme wind hazards. It will be a tool to professionals and decision makers to find quantitative solutions on how cities are designed and built so that they can continue to function following natural hazards.

Abdelhady is advised by Associate Professor Jason McCormick and Assistant Professor Seymour Spence.

Ahmed Abdelhady
Jessica Petras

Contact

Jessica Petras
Marketing Communications Specialist

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

(734) 764-9876

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