The Michigan Engineer News Center

Steven Byle wins Rosenblatt Award

Steven Byle (NAME BSE '91) was honored at the SNAME Annual Banquet as the 2018 Rosenblatt-Michigan Awardee for his transformative contributions to our department's future. | Short Read
EnlargeSteven Byle, with Connie Savander, Jing Sun, and Bruce Rosenblatt, receiving the Rosenblatt Award at the SNAME Annual Meeting in 2018
IMAGE:  Steven Byle, with Connie Savander, Jing Sun, and Bruce Rosenblatt, receiving the Rosenblatt Award at the SNAME Annual Meeting in 2018

Fellow NAME alumnus and friend of Byles, Constance Savander, said it best when presenting the award.

“This evening, Steven will receive the 2018 Rosenblatt-Michigan Award for outstanding professional achievements. This award can only go to University of Michigan, College of Engineering graduates that embody integrity, devotion to excellence, and continued interest in the welfare of the College of Engineering.

What makes Steven Byle deserving of this award? He is an entrepreneur with a broad base of experience across the energy, technology, and construction sectors. He specializes in projects and companies in remote and developing markets. He is socially and environmentally responsible through his entrepreneurial endeavors. He gives back to the very institutions that facilitated his impressive entrepreneurial career.

Steven is a fascinating and dynamic individual with a sense of adventure that knows few bounds – if any. We are grateful for his kindness and generosity to our historic Department of Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering.”

Steven Byle, with Connie Savander, Jing Sun, and Bruce Rosenblatt, receiving the Rosenblatt Award at the SNAME Annual Meeting in 2018
Portrait of Nicole Panyard

Contact

Nicole Frawley-Panyard
Marketing Communications Specialist

Naval Architecture & Marine Engineering

(734) 936-0567

219 NAME

The electrons absorb laser light and set up “momentum combs” (the hills) spanning the energy valleys within the material (the red line). When the electrons have an energy allowed by the quantum mechanical structure of the material—and also touch the edge of the valley—they emit light. This is why some teeth of the combs are bright and some are dark. By measuring the emitted light and precisely locating its source, the research mapped out the energy valleys in a 2D crystal of tungsten diselenide. Credit: Markus Borsch, Quantum Science Theory Lab, University of Michigan.

Mapping quantum structures with light to unlock their capabilities

Rather than installing new “2D” semiconductors in devices to see what they can do, this new method puts them through their paces with lasers and light detectors. | Medium Read