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Evgueni Filipov selected to participate in the U.S. National Academy of Sciences’ Symposium

Assistant Professor Evgueni Filipov was selected out of hundreds of candidates to take part in the National Academy of Sciences’ sixth annual Arab-American Frontiers of Science, Engineering, and Medicine Symposium. | Short Read

Civil and Environmental Engineering Assistant Professor Evgueni Filipov is one of the few selected from hundreds of applicants to take part in the National Academy of Sciences’ sixth annual Arab-American Frontiers of Science, Engineering, and Medicine Symposium.

The 2018 symposium will be hosted by Kuwait National Library in Kuwait City, Kuwait on November 4-6. This event brings together outstanding young scientists, engineers, and medical professionals from the United States and the 22 countries of the Arab League to discuss leading scientific advances on a wide range of topics relevant to the Middle East and North Africa region and globally.

The symposium will consist of sessions that are designed to explore the frontiers of research in the fields of water systems, big data, the microbiome, air quality, and next-generation buildings and infrastructure. Participants themselves will be able to discuss exciting advances and opportunities in their fields. The goal of these meetings is to allow for interesting cross-disciplinary discussions and research collaborations.

Filipov’s research interests are in the field of deployable and reconfigurable structural systems. His research also deals with the design and manufacturing of deployable structures using 3D printing and other fabrication techniques. He is interested in developing analytical tools that can simulate mechanical and multi-physical phenomena of deployable structures. Filipov has been awarded numerous awards including the National Academy of Sciences 2016 Cozzarelli Prize.

Jessica Petras

Contact

Jessica Petras
Marketing Communications Specialist

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

(734) 764-9876

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Sound wave visualization. Getty Images.

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