The Michigan Engineer News Center

Professor Eunshin Byon receives funding from National Science Foundation

Non-Intrusive Interpretation and Improvement of Multi-Occupancy Human Thermal Comfort through Analysis of Facial Infrared Thermography| Short Read

Title: Non-Intrusive Interpretation and Improvement of Multi-Occupancy Human Thermal Comfort through Analysis of Facial Infrared Thermography

Funding Source: National Science Foundation

In the U.S., heating ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems are the biggest energy end use in buildings, which accounts for 48% and 53% energy consumption in residential and commercial buildings respectively. Despite the significant energy footprint of HVAC systems, occupants in the built environment are often less than satisfied with their thermal comfort. This research will investigate methods to replace the current user-initiated passive and cumbersome thermal comfort feedback and control mechanism with a new non-intrusive and synchronous approach that can result in a comfortable, data-driven thermal environment without encumbering any proactive occupant feedback. The resulting new knowledge has the potential to transition the building HVAC control from a passive and user-empirical process to an automated, user-centric and data-driven mechanism that can simultaneously improve occupant satisfaction in indoor environments while reducing energy consumption. This is a joint research project with Professors Carol Menassa and Vineet Kamat in the Civil and Environmental Engineering Department.

a portrait of Robyn Bollman

Contact

Robyn Bollman
Research Administrator

Industrial and Operations Engineering

(734) 764-2478

1813 IOE Building

Researchers
The electrons absorb laser light and set up “momentum combs” (the hills) spanning the energy valleys within the material (the red line). When the electrons have an energy allowed by the quantum mechanical structure of the material—and also touch the edge of the valley—they emit light. This is why some teeth of the combs are bright and some are dark. By measuring the emitted light and precisely locating its source, the research mapped out the energy valleys in a 2D crystal of tungsten diselenide. Credit: Markus Borsch, Quantum Science Theory Lab, University of Michigan.

Mapping quantum structures with light to unlock their capabilities

Rather than installing new “2D” semiconductors in devices to see what they can do, this new method puts them through their paces with lasers and light detectors. | Medium Read