The Michigan Engineer News Center

Levi Thompson returns to his alma mater as dean of engineering

His appointment at University of Delaware begins October 1, 2018| Short Read
EnlargeLevi T. Thompson
IMAGE:  Levi T. Thompson, Richard E. Balzhiser Collegiate Professor of Chemical Engineering, Professor of Mechanical Engineering Photo: Joseph Xu, Michigan Engineering Communications and Marketing

Congratulations to Levi T. Thompson, the Richard E. Balzhiser Collegiate Professor of Chemical Engineering, on his appointment as dean of the University of Delaware’s College of Engineering, effective Oct. 1. He also will be appointed as Elizabeth Inez Kelley Professor of Chemical Engineering, with tenure, in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering.

In a note to his friends and colleagues at Michigan, Thompson writes: “My career as a chemical engineer started as an undergraduate at the University of Delaware but I grew into my profession at the University of Michigan as a graduate student, and later as a faculty member.

I met my wife of 30+ years here, our daughters were raised in Ann Arbor, and my youngest daughter is a rising senior at Michigan. The deep roots I have at the University and in the surrounding community form important parts of my foundation both personally and professionally.

It’s impossible to thank everyone that I should, but I want to first acknowledge all of my students, both graduate and undergraduate. I also want to thank a few colleagues without whom I would not be here; I thank Erdogan Gulari for his part in admitting me to the graduate program, Johannes Schwank for mentoring me during my graduate studies and Scott Fogler, who took a chance and hired me as an assistant professor.

This is a bittersweet moment, as I’m excited about the opportunity to help lead University of Delaware Engineering, I know I will also miss my friends and colleagues at Michigan Engineering. Levi T. Thompson

This is a bittersweet moment, as I’m excited about the opportunity to help lead University of Delaware Engineering, I know I will also miss my friends and colleagues at Michigan Engineering. Thank you all for making the last 30+ years so wonderful. Go Blue!!”

Thompson received his bachelor’s degree in chemical engineering at the University of Delaware. He went on to earn two master’s degrees from the University of Michigan in chemical engineering and nuclear engineering, as well as his doctorate in chemical engineering.

Thompson joined the department as an assistant professor in 1988 and has been the Richard E. Balzhiser Collegiate Professor of Chemical Engineering since 2005. He is also a professor of mechanical engineering. He served as associate dean for undergraduate education in the College of Engineering from 2001 through 2005, during which the College experienced significant increases in diversity, student retention and undergraduate enrollment, as well as an improved ranking.

He is director of the Hydrogen Energy Technology Laboratory and director of the Michigan-Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation. He has received numerous awards, including the University of Delaware Outstanding Alumnus award in 2006, a Michiganian of the Year award in 2006, an Engineering Society of Detroit Gold Award in 2007, the NSF Presidential Young Investigator award in 1991, and the Dow Chemical Good Teaching award in 1990.

Thompson is internationally recognized for his research to design and synthesize nanoscale materials for catalytic and energy storage applications. He also co-founded a start-up called T/J Technologies, a developer of nanostructured materials for lithium ion batteries, and helped to spin off a second start-up, Immatech Inc., from the University of Michigan to commercialize low cost, high-energy density supercapacitors.

The University of Delaware Office of Communications and Marketing contributed to this story.

Levi T. Thompson
Portrait of Sandy Swisher

Contact

Sandy Swisher
Communications & Alumni Relations Coordinator

Chemical Engineering

(734) 764-7413

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