The Michigan Engineer News Center

Brian R. Ellis Selected to Participate in Frontiers of Engineering Symposium

Assistant Professor Brian R. Ellis is among 84 of the nation’s brightest young engineers selected to take part in the National Academy of Engineering’s 24th annual U.S. Frontiers of Engineering symposium.| Short Read

Civil and Environmental Engineering Assistant Professor Brian R. Ellis is among 84 of the nation’s brightest young engineers selected to take part in the National Academy of Engineering’s (NAE) 24th annual U.S. Frontiers of Engineering symposium.

The 2018 symposium will be hosted by MIT Lincoln Laboratory in Lexington, Massachusetts, September 5-7. The participants – from industry, academia, and government – were nominated by fellow engineers or organizations.

This year’s event will cover cutting-edge developments in four areas: Quantum Computing, Technology for Humanitarian Assistance and Disaster Relief, Resilient and Reliable Infrastructure, and Theranostics.

“It is critically important to bring young engineers from different technical areas together to spark innovation,” said NAE President C. D. Mote, Jr. “The Frontiers of Engineering program does this by creating a space for talented engineers to learn from each other and expand their technical perspectives early in their careers.”

Ellis’ research interests cover topics related to the sustainable and safe development of emerging energy technologies. Included among these activities are geologic storage of CO2 and large-scale hydraulic fracturing of unconventional oil/gas reservoirs.

Jessica Petras

Contact

Jessica Petras
Marketing Communications Specialist

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

(734) 764-9876

GG Brown 2105E

Researchers
  • Brian R. Ellis

    Brian R. Ellis

    Assistant Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering

BepiColombo approaching Mercury. Credit: European Space Agency

U-M researchers to help unravel Mercury, solar system mysteries

In ESA's BepiColombo mission, an examination of the particles in Mercury's upper atmosphere will shed light on what the planet is made of. | Medium Read