The Michigan Engineer News Center

Two CEE Professors win NSF CAREER Awards

Assistant Professors Branko Kerkez and Seymour Spence have each been selected to receive a 2018 National Science Foundation (NSF) CAREER Award.| Short Read
EnlargePortrait of Branko Kerkez
IMAGE:  Brank Kerkez is a Assistant Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Two Civil and Environmental Engineering faculty members have each been selected to receive a 2018 National Science Foundation (NSF) CAREER Award. Assistant Professors Branko Kerkez and Seymour Spence both received the honor. The CAREER Award is one of the most prestigious awards granted to early-career researchers by the NSF. The award is given to junior faculty who exemplify the role of teacher-scholars through research, education and the integration of education and research within the context of the mission of their organizations.

Enlarge
IMAGE:  Portrait of Seymour MJ Spence

Professor Spence’s proposal, “Using Metamodeling to Enable High-Fidelity Modeling in Risk-based Multi-hazard Structural Design” focuses on the advancement of new computational tools to assess the reliability and risk of civil engineering structures exposed to wind and seismic hazards.

Professor Kerkez’s proposal, “Toward a Theory for Smart Stormwater Systems,” explores improvements in water flow and water quality through the adoption of monitoring and controls in urban watersheds.

The award will be used to fund each professor’s research proposal. Both award grants are for $500K, for a five year funding period.

Portrait of Branko Kerkez
Jessica Petras

Contact

Jessica Petras
Marketing Communications Specialist

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

(734) 764-9876

GG Brown 2105E

Researchers
  • Branko Kerkez

    Branko Kerkez

    Assistant Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering

  • Seymour Spence

    Seymour Spence

    Assistant Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering

BepiColombo approaching Mercury. Credit: European Space Agency

U-M researchers to help unravel Mercury, solar system mysteries

In ESA's BepiColombo mission, an examination of the particles in Mercury's upper atmosphere will shed light on what the planet is made of. | Medium Read