The Michigan Engineer News Center

Neda Masoud Selected for an ExCEEd Teaching Fellowship

Civil and Environmental Engineering Assistant Professor, Neda Masoud, has been selected as a 2018 ExCEEd Teaching Fellow.| Short Read

Civil and Environmental Engineering Assistant Professor, Neda Masoud, has been selected as a 2018 ExCEEd Teaching Fellow.

The ExCEEd Teaching Workshop is a faculty development program that is sponsored and organized by the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE).

Masoud was chosen to receive a fellowship for the August 5-10, 2018 teaching workshop held at Florida Gulf Coast University. This six-day workshop consists of an integrated program of seminars, demonstrations and labs. Subjects covered include effective teaching, applying learning style models, using classroom assessment techniques, formulating learning objectives and self-assessment.

EnlargeNeda Masoud
IMAGE:  Professor Neda Masoud

During the latter half of the ExCEEd Teaching Workshop, participants apply what they have learned by preparing and teaching three classes in a small-group setting. This collaborative “learn by doing” format ensures that participants will make substantive improvements in their teaching skills by the end of the course.

Masoud’s research interests are centered around applications of operations research in transportation, with a focus on surface transportation. Courses she offers include CEE 554: Data Mining in Transportation and CEE 557: Large-scale Transportation Systems Optimization.

Neda Masoud
Jessica Petras

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Jessica Petras
Marketing Communications Specialist

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

(734) 764-9876

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Researchers
  • Neda Masoud

    Neda Masoud

    Assistant Professor of Intelligent Systems and Next Generation Transportation Systems

BepiColombo approaching Mercury. Credit: European Space Agency

U-M researchers to help unravel Mercury, solar system mysteries

In ESA's BepiColombo mission, an examination of the particles in Mercury's upper atmosphere will shed light on what the planet is made of. | Medium Read