The Michigan Engineer News Center

Joi Mondisa receives 2018 Dr. Willie Hobbs Moore Aspire, Advance, Achieve Mentoring Award

Dr. Mondisa is a passionate mentor who actively engages in helping undergraduate and graduate students achieve their academic and personal goals.| Short Read
EnlargePhoto of Joi Mondisa with Willie Hobbs Moore Aspire, Advance, Achieve Mentoring Award
IMAGE:  Photo of Joi Mondisa with Willie Hobbs Moore Aspire, Advance, Achieve Mentoring Award

The Aspire, Advance, Achieve Mentoring Award is curated by the Women in Science and Engineering (WISE) and the Center for Engineering Diversity and Outreach organizations in honor of Willie Hobbs Moore, the first African-American woman to earn a Ph.D. in physics from any American university and a trailblazer in both the national and local Michigan technical community.   The award is for an individual who has served as a formal or informal mentor to students.  Mondisa is a passionate mentor who actively engages in helping undergraduate and graduate students achieve their academic and personal goals. She encourages belonging in the IOE community as an informal advisor and mentor for a student-faculty partnership program between the IOE department and the National Society of Black Engineers student chapter at Michigan.  As an Assistant Professor of IOE and an Engineering Education faculty, Mondisa specializes in understanding and deciphering mentoring practices, approaches, and programs in STEM education.  Mondisa uses her research findings to positively impact engineering undergraduate and graduate students and to create empirical evidence-based mentoring practices and curriculum.

Photo of Joi Mondisa with Willie Hobbs Moore Aspire, Advance, Achieve Mentoring Award
Portrait of Amanda Godwin

Contact

Amanda Godwin
Administrative Assistant

Industrial & Operations Engineering

(734) 764-6473

1891 IOE

BepiColombo approaching Mercury. Credit: European Space Agency

U-M researchers to help unravel Mercury, solar system mysteries

In ESA's BepiColombo mission, an examination of the particles in Mercury's upper atmosphere will shed light on what the planet is made of. | Medium Read