The Michigan Engineer News Center

Chinese Falling Space Station | U-M Experts Weigh In

University of Michigan experts comment on the China's first space station, Tiangong-1, that is in an uncontrolled de-orbit.| Short Read
University of Michigan experts comment on the China's first space station, Tiangong-1, that is in an uncontrolled de-orbit. The station is expected to either burn up completely in Earth's atmosphere or have small debris reach the ground between March 31 and April 1, 2018.

University of Michigan experts comment on China’s first space station, Tiangong-1, that is in an uncontrolled de-orbit.  The station is expected to either burn up completely in Earth’s atmosphere or have small debris reach the ground between March 31 and April 1, 2018.

Contact

Levi Hutmacher
Multimedia Content Producer

Michigan Engineering

(734) 647-7085

3214 SI-North

Researchers
  • Aaron Ridley

    Aaron Ridley

    Professor of Climate and Space Sciences and Engineering

  • James Cutler

    James Cutler

    Associate Professor of Aerospace Engineering and Associate Professor of Climate and Space Sciences and Engineering

  • Mike Liemohn

    Mike Liemohn

    Professor of Climate and Space Sciences and Engineering

Drone flying at night in the M-Air facility

M-Air autonomous aerial vehicle outdoor lab opens

Michigan Engineering now hosts advanced robotics facilities for land, air, sea, and space. | Medium Read