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Branko Kerkez Article Featured in NAE’s Latest Publication

CEE Assistant Professor, Branko Kerkez, is featured in the latest edition of The Bridge, the flagship quarterly publication of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE). | Short Read

CEE Assistant Professor, Branko Kerkez, is featured in the latest edition of The Bridge, the flagship quarterly publication of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE). Kerkez’s article, Building Smarter Water Systems, covers how new technologies make it possible to use existing water systems much more effectively.

Enlarge2018 The Bridge
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Smart technologies have the potential to dramatically reshape adaptation to some of the greatest water challenges, such as floods and droughts. Software-updatable water systems are well within reach, promising to enable highly cost-effective water infrastructure that dynamically redesigns itself in response to changing needs and uncertain inputs.

Autonomous water systems are well within reach, driven by pioneering efforts in a growing number of US communities and utilities. Early implementation of these systems indicates that, before resorting to costly new construction, it may already be possible to use existing infrastructure much more effectively.

Read Kerkez’s article in The Bridge

2018 The Bridge
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Researchers
  • Branko Kerkez

    Branko Kerkez

    Assistant Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering

The electrons absorb laser light and set up “momentum combs” (the hills) spanning the energy valleys within the material (the red line). When the electrons have an energy allowed by the quantum mechanical structure of the material—and also touch the edge of the valley—they emit light. This is why some teeth of the combs are bright and some are dark. By measuring the emitted light and precisely locating its source, the research mapped out the energy valleys in a 2D crystal of tungsten diselenide. Credit: Markus Borsch, Quantum Science Theory Lab, University of Michigan.

Mapping quantum structures with light to unlock their capabilities

Rather than installing new “2D” semiconductors in devices to see what they can do, this new method puts them through their paces with lasers and light detectors. | Medium Read