The Michigan Engineer News Center

A Conversation with David Kelley: IDEO Founder

IDEO Founder David Kelley will lecture on Wednesday, March 28th, 2018 in Chesebrough Auditorium at 5:30pm. Please register in advance.| Short Read
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Moderated by Panos Papalambros

David Kelley is founder and board chair of the global design and innovation company, IDEO. He also founded Stanford University’s Hasso Plattner Institute of Design, known as the d.school. As Stanford’s Donald W. Whittier Professor in Mechanical Engineering, Kelley is the Academic Director of the degree-granting undergraduate and graduate programs in design in the School of Engineering where he has served as professor for more than 35 years. A graduate of Carnegie Mellon University Kelley earned his master’s degree from Stanford University in Engineering Product Design. Kelley’s work has been acknowledged with numerous design awards, including induction into the National Academy of Engineering, and honorary PhDs from the Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth and the Art Center College in Pasadena. Widely known for teaching human-centered design methodology and design thinking to students and business executives, Kelley and his brother Tom co-authored the New York Times best-selling book, “Creative Confidence” (Unleashing the Creative Potential Within Us All).

He will address questions submitted by the audience in advance.

Please register by March 19th: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSdzgQh7JFdKMCON-pcvKVN7GBZs7S8fjC3Zoyvihj22oupvPg/viewform

The electrons absorb laser light and set up “momentum combs” (the hills) spanning the energy valleys within the material (the red line). When the electrons have an energy allowed by the quantum mechanical structure of the material—and also touch the edge of the valley—they emit light. This is why some teeth of the combs are bright and some are dark. By measuring the emitted light and precisely locating its source, the research mapped out the energy valleys in a 2D crystal of tungsten diselenide. Credit: Markus Borsch, Quantum Science Theory Lab, University of Michigan.

Mapping quantum structures with light to unlock their capabilities

Rather than installing new “2D” semiconductors in devices to see what they can do, this new method puts them through their paces with lasers and light detectors. | Medium Read