The Michigan Engineer News Center

CEE’s Kate Dowdell Awarded AWWA Fellowship

Environmental Engineering PhD student, Kate Dowdell, has been awarded a fellowship for water quality and treatment research from the Michigan Section of the American Water Works Association (MI-AWWA).| Short Read

Environmental Engineering PhD student, Kate Dowdell, has been awarded a fellowship for water quality and treatment research from the Michigan Section of the American Water Works Association (MI-AWWA).

Dowdell’s project, “Reducing Selection of Opportunistic Bacterial Pathogens in Biological Drinking Water Filters,” was selected based on the merits of the study, as well as Dowdell’s high academic achievements. Dowdell is sponsored by Environmental Engineering Professor, Lutgarde Raskin.

EnlargeKatherine Dowdell
IMAGE:  Katherine Dowdell

The primary goal of the MI-AWWA fellowship is to stimulate greater involvement of Michigan’s academic institutions and their graduate and undergraduate students in the study of drinking water related fields. AWWA encourages innovative solutions to priority problems of the drinking water community.

The fellowship program is one year in length. $3,000 is awarded, with $2,000 provided to Kate Dowdell and $1,000 to be used by the sponsoring professor, Lutgarde Raskin, for research-related projects. Upon completion of the fellowship, recipients are encouraged to submit a research paper or present their findings at an AWWA sponsored event.

MI-AWWA is a large community of water professionals, now totaling about 1700 members. These water pioneers are leading the advancement of water knowledge and improving the value and quality of water in Michigan.

Katherine Dowdell
Jessica Petras

Contact

Jessica Petras
Marketing Communications Specialist

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

(734) 764-9876

GG Brown 2105E

BepiColombo approaching Mercury. Credit: European Space Agency

U-M researchers to help unravel Mercury, solar system mysteries

In ESA's BepiColombo mission, an examination of the particles in Mercury's upper atmosphere will shed light on what the planet is made of. | Medium Read