The Michigan Engineer News Center

2018 Outstanding Faculty Achievement Award goes to Matthew Johnson-Roberson

Assistant Professor, Matthew Johnson-Roberson has received the 2017-2018 Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering Department Outstanding Faculty Award.| Short Read
Enlargea portrait of Matthew Johnson-Roberson
IMAGE:  Assistant Professor Matthew Johnson-Roberson

This annual award is presented in recognition for excellence in teaching, research, and service.

Matthew Johnson-Roberson also has a Joint Appointment with the Computer Science and Engineering Department. He received a Ph.D. from the University of Sydney in 2010. There he worked on Autonomous Underwater Vehicles for long-term environmental monitoring.

Upon joining the University of Michigan faculty in 2013, he created the DROP (Deep Robot Optical Perception) Lab, which researches 3D reconstruction, segmentation, data mining, and visualization. He has held prior postdoctoral appointments with the Centre for Autonomous Systems – CAS at KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm and the Australian Centre for Field Robotics at the University of Sydney. He is a recipient of the NSF CAREER award (2015).

 

a portrait of Matthew Johnson-Roberson
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Contact

Nicole Frawley-Panyard
Marketing Communications Specialist

Naval Architecture & Marine Engineering

(734) 936-0567

219 NAME

The electrons absorb laser light and set up “momentum combs” (the hills) spanning the energy valleys within the material (the red line). When the electrons have an energy allowed by the quantum mechanical structure of the material—and also touch the edge of the valley—they emit light. This is why some teeth of the combs are bright and some are dark. By measuring the emitted light and precisely locating its source, the research mapped out the energy valleys in a 2D crystal of tungsten diselenide. Credit: Markus Borsch, Quantum Science Theory Lab, University of Michigan.

Mapping quantum structures with light to unlock their capabilities

Rather than installing new “2D” semiconductors in devices to see what they can do, this new method puts them through their paces with lasers and light detectors. | Medium Read