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Students shine at international ship design competition

Claiming 1st place prize four times in the past seven years in the Dr. James A. Lisnyk Student Ship Design Competition, University of Michigan students prove they are the ones to beat. | Long Read
Enlarge2017 Lisnyk Winning Ship Design
IMAGE:  2017 Lisnyk Winning Ship Design

Since 2011, when Associate Professor Matthew Collette revamped his Marine Design Team Project course (NA 475), NAME students have consistently earned high honors at the Society for Naval Architects and Marine Engineers (SNAME) Annual Meeting for their work in cutting-edge ship design.

The Dr. James A Lisnyk Student Ship Design Competition challenges groups of young people to design theoretical but practical cutting-edge vessels. Open to the world’s colleges and universities supporting maritime careers, the program has fostered teamwork and learning through competition. The award is presented annually at the SNAME meeting to the team that submits the best comprehensive ship design plan.

University of Michigan NAME teams have won the competition four times in the last seven years and placed in the top three multiple times as well. This year was no exception.

EnlargeWinning Team members Samuel Edwards, Nicholas English, Clay Kane, Jessica Reid, and Matthew Shirmann after winning the 2017 Lisnyk Student Ship Design Competition
IMAGE:  Winning Team members Samuel Edwards, Nicholas English, Clay Kane, Jessica Reid, and Matthew Shirmann after winning the 2017 Lisnyk Student Ship Design Competition

The winning team’s submission was a design for a Ballast-Free Liquified Natural Gas (LNG) Carrier vessel. The concept represents a paradigm shift in vessel design. Implementing a cutting-edge structural design theory known as Advanced Double Hull allows for water to flow unimpeded through the bottom of the ship, as opposed to holding stagnant water in large tanks. Since ballast water discharge can contain a variety of biological materials (from toxic algae to cholera) that are often non-native, they can cause major damage to aquatic ecosystems. The constant flow of water in the Ballast-Free design reduces the environmental impact of transoceanic trade and can improve the overall efficiency of the vessel.

Finishing 3rd in this year’s competition, was a nuclear powered submarine (SSUN) that is designed to deploy unmanned underwater vehicles (UUV’s) from two launch bays: one forward and one amidships. The goal of the design was to address fundamental design challenges with stealth deployments of large vehicles from submarines while addressing future technology adaptation for the US Navy.

EnlargeUUV deploying submarine design
IMAGE:  Rendering of UUV deploying submarine, 3rd place finisher in 2017 Lisnyk Ship Design Competition

With the current continued development of unmanned vehicle technology from the land, air and sea, the capabilities of such a vessel could have far-ranging applications. Team members James Coller, James Spain, Darrell Hall, and James Carpenter were also awarded the Ackles Award by the Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering Department in April for their design.

Past winning teams have also included a variety of creative designs aimed at combating real world issues facing the challenges posed by a difficult marine environment including:

A 2011 Arctic Intervention Icebreaking vessel that is able to safely handle the challenges of the Arctic environment while installing and servicing subsea equipment. Unique design features include; a bow for icebreaking, an extended parallel midbody, and an expansive working deck. The long range and endurance capabilities allow the vessel to handle long term projects and the deck equipment and ROV facilities allow the ship to accomplish a wide range of subsea tasks.

Enlarge2011 winning design for an Arctic Intervention Icebreaker vessel
IMAGE:  2011 winning design for an Arctic Intervention Icebreaker vessel

A 2014 Research Vessel Floating Instrument Platform (FLIP) that is intentionally flooded to “flip” from horizontal to 90 degrees vertical which allows the platform to moor in position and conduct scientific experiments with minimal wave interference. This redesign of the original FLIP has self-propulsion and self-mooring capabilities with significant improvements in habitability and scientific capacity.

Enlarge2014 winning ship design R/V FLIP II
IMAGE:  2014 winning ship design R/V FLIP II

A 2016 Replacement Heavy Icebreaker aimed at expanding icebreaking, search and rescue, and law enforcement capabilities of the U.S. Coast Guard in the polar regions of the globe. Capable of continuously breaking 2.5 meters of ice at 3 knots, the Polar Storm has two helicopters, a Landing Craft Vehicle Personnel (LCVP), two Rigid-hull Inflatable Boats (RHIBs) and an arctic research vessel.

Enlarge2016 winning design for a replacement heavy icebreaker for the U.S. Coast Guard
IMAGE:  2016 winning design for a replacement heavy icebreaker for the U.S. Coast Guard

These and more student ship designs are the result of Assistant Professor, Matthew D. Collette’s senior design capstone course, the best of which takes home the departmental Ackles Award each year and goes on to compete at SNAME for the Lisnyk honor. The course allows for small student teams to create, develop, and document original marine designs to contract design level and involves extensive project planning and weekly progress reporting. The course culminates in the oral presentation of the project to both faculty and marine industry experts.

"It is wonderful to watch our students receive international accolades for their hard work at the start of their careers."Assistant Professor Matthew Collette

Associate Professor Collette is proud, but not surprised by the student’s success. “Our recent string of successes in the Lisnyk competition reflects the growing strength of our students and the entire NAME curriculum from Engineering 100 through the NA 475 senior capstone. This recognition is a demonstration of the design vision, enthusiasm for the chosen profession, and the analytical skill contained in our student body. It is wonderful to watch our students receive international accolades for their hard work at the start of their careers.”

ONR RP FLIP vessel at vertical

FLIP in action

The R/P FLIP platform is frequently mistaken for a capsized ocean transport ship when in its vertical position.

2017 Lisnyk Winning Ship Design
Winning Team members Samuel Edwards, Nicholas English, Clay Kane, Jessica Reid, and Matthew Shirmann after winning the 2017 Lisnyk Student Ship Design Competition
UUV deploying submarine design
2011 winning design for an Arctic Intervention Icebreaker vessel
2014 winning ship design R/V FLIP II
2016 winning design for a replacement heavy icebreaker for the U.S. Coast Guard
Portrait of Nicole Panyard

Contact

Nicole Frawley-Panyard
Marketing Communications Specialist

Naval Architecture & Marine Engineering

(734) 936-0567

219 NAME

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