The Michigan Engineer News Center

Aero Lab Supervisor Tom Griffin receives inaugural Mart Stenzel Staff Dedication Award

Laboratory Services Supervisor Tom Griffin has received the inaugural Mart Stenzel Staff Dedication Award for his exceptional contributions to the U-M Aero Department! | Short Read
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IMAGE:  Lab Services Supervisor Tom Griffin (left) receives Mart Stenzel Staff Dedication award from Department Chair Dan Inman (right).

Supervisor of Laboratory Services Tom Griffin has received the inaugural Mart Stenzel Staff Dedication Award for his exceptional contributions to the Department of Aerospace Engineering over the past 33 years!

Tom was honored for his award during the annual Aerospace Engineering Holiday Party, held this year at the Michigan Football Stadium on December 8th, 2017.

Mr. Griffin joined the U-M Aero Department in 1984. He has served as a beloved mentor to generations of students and is a leader to his colleagues at the department and university level. Among his many roles, Mr. Griffin plans, coordinates and supervises the technical support functions for instructional and research laboratories, manages academic and research facilities maintenance, and co-chairs the Aero Safety Committee.

Thank you, Tom, for your phenomenal service to our community!

Portrait of Kim Johnson

Contact

Kimberly Johnson
Communications Manager

Aerospace Engineering

(734) 647-4701

3054 FXB

The electrons absorb laser light and set up “momentum combs” (the hills) spanning the energy valleys within the material (the red line). When the electrons have an energy allowed by the quantum mechanical structure of the material—and also touch the edge of the valley—they emit light. This is why some teeth of the combs are bright and some are dark. By measuring the emitted light and precisely locating its source, the research mapped out the energy valleys in a 2D crystal of tungsten diselenide. Credit: Markus Borsch, Quantum Science Theory Lab, University of Michigan.

Mapping quantum structures with light to unlock their capabilities

Rather than installing new “2D” semiconductors in devices to see what they can do, this new method puts them through their paces with lasers and light detectors. | Medium Read