The Michigan Engineer News Center

RadLab: In service to society

Though in its early days the activities of the Radiation Laboratory were top secret, the world would soon learn of and benefit from its research.| Short Read

The origins of the Radiation Lab – or RadLab, as it is sometimes called – can be traced all the way back to the period immediately following the end of World War II, when a portion of the Willow Run Airport, originally built for aircraft (and, in particular, production of the B-24 Liberator bomber), was sold to the University of Michigan for a mere dollar.

See what this center ultimately turned into, and the many research paths it would pursue, in this RadLab Story.

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The electrons absorb laser light and set up “momentum combs” (the hills) spanning the energy valleys within the material (the red line). When the electrons have an energy allowed by the quantum mechanical structure of the material—and also touch the edge of the valley—they emit light. This is why some teeth of the combs are bright and some are dark. By measuring the emitted light and precisely locating its source, the research mapped out the energy valleys in a 2D crystal of tungsten diselenide. Credit: Markus Borsch, Quantum Science Theory Lab, University of Michigan.

Mapping quantum structures with light to unlock their capabilities

Rather than installing new “2D” semiconductors in devices to see what they can do, this new method puts them through their paces with lasers and light detectors. | Medium Read