The Michigan Engineer News Center

Campus of the future: It’s about connections, not tech

Op-ed from Michigan Daily by contributor and MSE professor Joanna Millunchick.| Medium Read

Think about the iconic learning space of higher education: the lecture hall. It is iconic because it has been a staple in universities since their beginning. Medieval images from the University of Bologna, founded in 1088, show students listening, pretending to listen or napping before a professor.

The lecture hall was a technological solution to the social and economic problem of disseminating information efficiently and affordably. The lecture hall solved it by being an auditorium, a place of listening. A single expert could disseminate information by having many people listen to him (always him) silently.

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Researchers
The electrons absorb laser light and set up “momentum combs” (the hills) spanning the energy valleys within the material (the red line). When the electrons have an energy allowed by the quantum mechanical structure of the material—and also touch the edge of the valley—they emit light. This is why some teeth of the combs are bright and some are dark. By measuring the emitted light and precisely locating its source, the research mapped out the energy valleys in a 2D crystal of tungsten diselenide. Credit: Markus Borsch, Quantum Science Theory Lab, University of Michigan.

Mapping quantum structures with light to unlock their capabilities

Rather than installing new “2D” semiconductors in devices to see what they can do, this new method puts them through their paces with lasers and light detectors. | Medium Read