The Michigan Engineer News Center

Daniel S. Herman Scholarship endowed

This gift will provide need-based support for full-time undergraduate students focusing in healthcare in the Department of Industrial and Operations Engineering (IOE).| Short Read
EnlargeDaniel Herman
IMAGE:  Daniel Herman

Daniel S. Herman (BSE IOE ’82) and Kristin O’Leske have endowed the Daniel S. Herman Scholarship to provide need-based support for full-time undergraduate students focusing in healthcare in the Department of Industrial and Operations Engineering (IOE).  This gift qualifies for the Bicentennial Opportunity Matching Initiative.

With more than 35 years of experience in the healthcare information technology industry, Daniel S. Herman founded Aspen Advisors and currently serves as Consulting Director in the Informatics and Technology practice of The Chartis Group, where he assists healthcare providers in optimizing the value of their technology investments.  Mr. Herman holds a MBA with a concentration in information systems from the Weatherhead School of Management at Case Western Reserve University, and he graduated from the U-M with a BSE in industrial and operations engineering.  

Ms. Kristin O’Leske is a seasoned executive with over 25 years of experience in a variety of industries.  She began her career with Andersen Consulting and reached a professional pinnacle as Chief Administrative Officer of an awarding-winning healthcare consulting firm, Aspen Advisors, where she led finance and operations.  She holds a MBA in international finance from Thunderbird, School of Global Management as well as a BA in economics and business Spanish from the University of Colorado at Boulder.  She currently serves as a consultant, and volunteers her time with non-profit boards.

Mr. Herman and Ms. O’Leske reside in Morrison, Colorado.

Daniel Herman
Jon Kinsey

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Jon Kinsey
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Michigan Engineering

(734) 647-7099

2466 LEC

The electrons absorb laser light and set up “momentum combs” (the hills) spanning the energy valleys within the material (the red line). When the electrons have an energy allowed by the quantum mechanical structure of the material—and also touch the edge of the valley—they emit light. This is why some teeth of the combs are bright and some are dark. By measuring the emitted light and precisely locating its source, the research mapped out the energy valleys in a 2D crystal of tungsten diselenide. Credit: Markus Borsch, Quantum Science Theory Lab, University of Michigan.

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