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Codeon is the intelligent assistant for software developers

With Codeon, developers can request help by speaking their requests aloud within the context of their Integrated Development Environment (IDE).| Short Read
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Researchers, including Profs. Walter S. Lasecki and Steve Oney, CS undergraduate student Yiwei Yang, and CSE graduate students Yan Chen, Yin Xie, and Sang Won Lee have created Codeon, a system that enables more effective task hand-off between end-user developers and remote helpers by allowing asynchronous responses to on-demand requests. With Codeon, developers can request help by speaking their requests aloud within the context of their Integrated Development Environment (IDE).

Codeon automatically captures the relevant code context and allows remote helpers to respond with high-level descriptions, code annotations, code snippets, and natural language explanations. Developers can then immediately view and integrate these responses into their code. It makes it easy for developers to make sufficiently detailed requests and send to other developers, making the process quick and effective. Codeon’s asynchronous model also scalable more effectively for multiple helpers than synchronous support tools because it allows multiple helpers to work in parallel with the developer.

The researchers found that developers using Codeon completed nearly twice as many tasks as those who used state-of-the-art synchronous video and code sharing tools, thanks to the reduction in coordination costs of seeking assistance from other developers.

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Researchers
  • Walter Lasecki

    Walter Lasecki

    Assistant Professor, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Assistant Professor, School of Information

The electrons absorb laser light and set up “momentum combs” (the hills) spanning the energy valleys within the material (the red line). When the electrons have an energy allowed by the quantum mechanical structure of the material—and also touch the edge of the valley—they emit light. This is why some teeth of the combs are bright and some are dark. By measuring the emitted light and precisely locating its source, the research mapped out the energy valleys in a 2D crystal of tungsten diselenide. Credit: Markus Borsch, Quantum Science Theory Lab, University of Michigan.

Mapping quantum structures with light to unlock their capabilities

Rather than installing new “2D” semiconductors in devices to see what they can do, this new method puts them through their paces with lasers and light detectors. | Medium Read