The Michigan Engineer News Center

Ron Larson receives outstanding achievement award

Ron Larson, the George Granger Brown and A.H. White Distinguished University Professor of Chemical Engineering has received the 2017 Department of Chemical Engineering Outstanding Faculty Achievement Award.| Short Read
EnlargePortrait of Ron Larson
IMAGE:   Ron Larson is the A H White Distinguished University Professor of Chemical Engineering

Ron Larson, the George Granger Brown and A.H. White Distinguished University Professor of Chemical Engineering has received the 2017 Department of Chemical Engineering Outstanding Faculty Achievement Award.

Larson, a member of the National Academy of Engineering since 2003, is a distinguished researcher, teacher, and leader.  He is well-known for his expertise in complex fluids and polymers and has advised 20 PhD students and published nearly 400 research articles. He served as chair of the department from 2000-2008 and as the interim chair of Biomedical Engineering Department from 2013-2014.
In addition to the Distinguished University Professorship, he received the College of Engineering’s Steven S. Attwood Award. He was also the recipient of the Bingham Medal from the Society of Rheology and AIChE’s Alpha Chi Sigma Award.

He began his career at the University of Michigan in 1996 after working for Bell Labs. He is also a member of the faculty of the Biomedical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Macromolecular Science and Engineering Departments.

Portrait of Ron Larson
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Sandy Swisher
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The electrons absorb laser light and set up “momentum combs” (the hills) spanning the energy valleys within the material (the red line). When the electrons have an energy allowed by the quantum mechanical structure of the material—and also touch the edge of the valley—they emit light. This is why some teeth of the combs are bright and some are dark. By measuring the emitted light and precisely locating its source, the research mapped out the energy valleys in a 2D crystal of tungsten diselenide. Credit: Markus Borsch, Quantum Science Theory Lab, University of Michigan.

Mapping quantum structures with light to unlock their capabilities

Rather than installing new “2D” semiconductors in devices to see what they can do, this new method puts them through their paces with lasers and light detectors. | Medium Read