The Michigan Engineer News Center

Paul Beata named 2015-16 J. Robert Beyster Computational Innovation Graduate Fellow

Michigan Engineering doctoral student Paul Beata has been chosen as the 2015-16 fellow for the J. Robert Beyster Computational Innovation Graduate Fellows Program.| Short Read
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Michigan Engineering doctoral student Paul Beata has been chosen as the 2015-16 fellow for the J. Robert Beyster Computational Innovation Graduate Fellows Program.

Paul is a Ph.D. candidate in Civil and Environmental Engineering. As a Beyster Fellow, he will be performing computational materials simulations of the dynamic polymerization of the epoxy/graphite interface, which, among other benefits, will translate to significant improvements in fuel efficiency across all industries.

Paul is past president of the U-M chapter of Bridges to Prosperity.

The J. Robert Beyster Computational Innovation Graduate Fellows Program was established by four-time alum Dr. J. Robert Beyster (BSE Engineering Math 1945, BSE Engineering Physics 1945, MS Physics 1947, PhD Physics 1950) and his wife Betty to acknowledge that doctoral students are “the originators and carriers of innovative ideas and solutions from the University to the world”, and to emphasize the pivotal role that high-performance computing must play in solving our societal challenges.

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The electrons absorb laser light and set up “momentum combs” (the hills) spanning the energy valleys within the material (the red line). When the electrons have an energy allowed by the quantum mechanical structure of the material—and also touch the edge of the valley—they emit light. This is why some teeth of the combs are bright and some are dark. By measuring the emitted light and precisely locating its source, the research mapped out the energy valleys in a 2D crystal of tungsten diselenide. Credit: Markus Borsch, Quantum Science Theory Lab, University of Michigan.

Mapping quantum structures with light to unlock their capabilities

Rather than installing new “2D” semiconductors in devices to see what they can do, this new method puts them through their paces with lasers and light detectors. | Medium Read