The Michigan Engineer News Center

Lattice Data, Inc supports CSE students

The gift supplemented the Computer Science and Engineering Special Projects Fund.| Short Read
EnlargePortrait of Michael Cafarella
IMAGE:  Michael Cafarella is a co-founder of Lattice, Inc., and an associate professor of computer science and engineering.

Lattice Data, Inc. has recently provided a gift to the College of Engineering to benefit the Computer Science and Engineering Division of the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. The gift supplemented the Computer Science and Engineering Special Projects Fund, an endowment that supports student projects, special instructional needs, seminars and special visitors to the division and other activities related to the mission of the division.

Located in Menlo Park, California, Lattice Data is a data intelligence company that transforms “dark data”, such as unstructured text and images, into high quality structured data for use by traditional data analysis tools. Lattice Data was co-founded by Christopher Ré, a Stanford University associate professor of Computer Science; Michael Cafarella, an associate professor of Computer Science and Engineering at the U-M College of Engineering; and Feng Niu, Ph.D.

Portrait of Michael Cafarella
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Researchers
The electrons absorb laser light and set up “momentum combs” (the hills) spanning the energy valleys within the material (the red line). When the electrons have an energy allowed by the quantum mechanical structure of the material—and also touch the edge of the valley—they emit light. This is why some teeth of the combs are bright and some are dark. By measuring the emitted light and precisely locating its source, the research mapped out the energy valleys in a 2D crystal of tungsten diselenide. Credit: Markus Borsch, Quantum Science Theory Lab, University of Michigan.

Mapping quantum structures with light to unlock their capabilities

Rather than installing new “2D” semiconductors in devices to see what they can do, this new method puts them through their paces with lasers and light detectors. | Medium Read