The Michigan Engineer News Center

Yasmine Doleyres: Making strides in breast cancer research

PhD student Yasmine Doleyres combines principles of tissue engineering and drug delivery to make improvements in breast cancer treatment.| Short Read
EnlargePortrait of Yasmine Doleyres.
IMAGE:  Portrait of Yasmine Doleyres. Photo: Joseph Xu, Michigan Engineering Communications & Marketing

Status: PhD student

Hometown: Uniondale, Long Island, NY

Department: Macromolecular Sciences and Engineering

PhD student Yasmine Doleyres is hoping to conquer breast cancer through engineering research. She combines principles of tissue engineering and drug delivery to make improvements in breast cancer treatment and other soft tissue defects. Yasmine uses unique microsphere scaffolds in the lab to produce connective tissue with blood vessels, while nanospheres simultaneously target residual cancer cells.

Yasmine came to Michigan for graduate school because she enjoys the research happening in her discipline, and would like to gain flexibility in industry while still leaving herself the opportunity to teach later on. For now, she aims to work for a pharmaceutical company and translate biomaterials research into industry after graduation.

Yasmine is a dedicated member of the Society of Minority Engineers and Scientists-Graduate Component, a social and academic network within Michigan’s College of Engineering that connects graduate students of color. She held the program’s co-chair position during her second year at school, and continues to stay active through attending monthly meetings, recruiting new members, and volunteering with SMES-G.

When she’s not in the lab, Yasmine volunteers as a mentor for youths through Big Brothers Big Sisters, plays the piano and flute, runs, and practices Capoeria, a Brazilian martial art that incorporates dance and acrobatics.

Portrait of Yasmine Doleyres.
Metal rods that are part of the molecular epitaxy beam apparatus at Michigan Engineering. Photo by Joseph Xu, Michigan Engineering Communications & Marketing

Nanoparticles could spur better LEDs, invisibility cloaks

More efficient household LEDs and invisibility cloaking are two possible applications for a new process that adds metallic nanoparticles to semiconductors. | Medium Read