The Michigan Engineer News Center

Pascal Van Hentenryck leads new public urban transportation project

Initiative focuses on data science collaboration between U-M, government and industry.| Short Read

U-M Industrial and Operations Engineering (IOE) professor Pascal Van Hentenryck is the lead researcher for a MIDAS (Michigan Institute for Data Science Challenge Initiatives) project that was recently awarded funding of $1.25 million dollars. The goal of the multiyear MIDAS Challenge Initiatives program is to foster data science projects that have the potential to prompt new partnerships between U-M, federal research agencies and industry.

Project Title: Reinventing Public Urban Transportation and Mobility

Description: The project will help design and operate an on-demand, public transportation system for urban areas in which a fleet of connected and automated vehicles are synchronized with buses and light rail, using predictive models based on high volumes of diverse transportation data. The goal is to begin testing on the U-M campus within a year, and then expand the experiment to Ann Arbor and Detroit.

Lead researcher: Pascal Van Hentenryck, Industrial Operations and Engineering

Research team: Ceren Budak and Tawanna Dillahunt, School of Information; Amy Cohn, Industrial and Operations Engineering; Rebecca Cunningham, Emergency Medicine; Robert Hampshire and Jim Sayer, U-M Transportation Research Institute; Jerome Lynch, Civil and Environmental Engineering; Jonathan Levine and Louis Merlin, Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning; Luis Ortiz, Computer and Information Science, UM-Dearborn; and Michael Wellman, Computer Science and Engineering.

Read more at: http://record.umich.edu/articles/transportation-learning-analytics-projects-get-data-science-funding

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  • Portrait of Pascal Van Hentenryck

    Pascal van Hentenryck

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The electrons absorb laser light and set up “momentum combs” (the hills) spanning the energy valleys within the material (the red line). When the electrons have an energy allowed by the quantum mechanical structure of the material—and also touch the edge of the valley—they emit light. This is why some teeth of the combs are bright and some are dark. By measuring the emitted light and precisely locating its source, the research mapped out the energy valleys in a 2D crystal of tungsten diselenide. Credit: Markus Borsch, Quantum Science Theory Lab, University of Michigan.

Mapping quantum structures with light to unlock their capabilities

Rather than installing new “2D” semiconductors in devices to see what they can do, this new method puts them through their paces with lasers and light detectors. | Medium Read