The Michigan Engineer News Center

Pascal Van Hentenryck elected as INFORMS Fellow

Pascal Van Hentenryck was one of 12 Fellows announced by the The Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences.| Short Read

Pascal Van Hentenryck, Seth Bonder Collegiate Professor of Industrial & Operations Engineering, was one of 12 Fellows announced on October 22, 2016 by the The Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences (INFORMS). Please join us in congratulating him on this award!

The INFORMS Fellow Award, which brings together the very best operations researchers and analytics experts throughout the world, recognizes outstanding achievement in the following areas:

  • education in the field of operations research/management science
  • management of operations research/management science, including responsibility for applying the profession’s techniques within an organization of any type
  • the practice of operations research/management science/analytics research
  • service to INFORMS and the profession

Pascal was recognized for his scientific contributions to constraint programming, discrete optimization, global optimization, local search and stochastic optimization as well as his many contributions to the practice of operation research and the education of future practitioners.

Researchers
  • Pascal Van Hentenryck

    Pascal Van Hentenryck

    Pascal Van Hentenryck, Seth Bonder Collegiate Professor of Industrial & Operations Engineering

The electrons absorb laser light and set up “momentum combs” (the hills) spanning the energy valleys within the material (the red line). When the electrons have an energy allowed by the quantum mechanical structure of the material—and also touch the edge of the valley—they emit light. This is why some teeth of the combs are bright and some are dark. By measuring the emitted light and precisely locating its source, the research mapped out the energy valleys in a 2D crystal of tungsten diselenide. Credit: Markus Borsch, Quantum Science Theory Lab, University of Michigan.

Mapping quantum structures with light to unlock their capabilities

Rather than installing new “2D” semiconductors in devices to see what they can do, this new method puts them through their paces with lasers and light detectors. | Medium Read