The Michigan Engineer News Center

Lingjia Tang selected to receive Facebook Faculty Award

She recently helped develop a modular load tester platform for data centers, which is designed to help measure and mitigate tail latency.| Short Read
EnlargeProf. Lingjia Tang
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Prof. Lingjia Tang has been selected to receive a Facebook Faculty Award for her work in computer architecture.

She recently helped develop a modular load tester platform for data centers, which is designed to help measure and mitigate tail latency. The platform, called Treadmill, is widely used in Facebook’s production services. It is also open-sourced and available to the general public and industry practitioners.

Tang is also the co-founder and COO of Clinc, Inc., a startup focusing on real-world applications for artificial intelligence. Most recently, Clinc launched a new product called, Finie, which can be referred to as the “Siri” of personal banking. The platform is an intelligent personal financial assistant, that when combined with other mobile banking apps, allows customers talk to their bank accounts in a natural and conversational way to get real-time and instant financial insights.

Clinc also built Lucida, its state-of- the-art, open-source intelligent assistant and machine learning platform that allows developers and the open-source community to easily create and deploy personalized voice and vision-based intelligent assistants in applications beneficial to society – such as non-profit education and improving technological access for the disabled.

Prof. Lingjia Tang received her PhD in Computer Science at The University of Virginia in 2012 and joined the faculty at Michigan in 2013. Before joining U-M, she was a research faculty in the CSE department at The University of California, San Diego. She has authored a number of best papers and had publications chosen for IEEE Micro’s Top Picks in 2012 and 2016.

Prof. Lingjia Tang
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Researchers

An even smaller world’s smallest ‘computer’

The latest from IBM and now the University of Michigan is redefining what counts as a computer at the microscale. | Short Read