The Michigan Engineer News Center

Building the internet of water

Sensor nodes that measure the water flow, soil moisture, rainfall and other rapidly changing storm predictors.| Short Read

Developing technologies to make environmental information more easily accessible is how Assistant Professor Branko Kerkez’s team of UM researchers plan to create a smarter water system out of existing infrastructure.

Sensor nodes that measure the water flow, soil moisture, rainfall and other rapidly changing storm predictors are being installed along a three square mile local water catchment. With the data being posted in real time over the internet, Kerkez hopes this can someday be paired with sensors on waste water pipes designed to redirect and reuse excess water flow into less impacted neighborhoods.

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  • Branko Kerkez

    Branko Kerkez

    Assistant Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering

The electrons absorb laser light and set up “momentum combs” (the hills) spanning the energy valleys within the material (the red line). When the electrons have an energy allowed by the quantum mechanical structure of the material—and also touch the edge of the valley—they emit light. This is why some teeth of the combs are bright and some are dark. By measuring the emitted light and precisely locating its source, the research mapped out the energy valleys in a 2D crystal of tungsten diselenide. Credit: Markus Borsch, Quantum Science Theory Lab, University of Michigan.

Mapping quantum structures with light to unlock their capabilities

Rather than installing new “2D” semiconductors in devices to see what they can do, this new method puts them through their paces with lasers and light detectors. | Medium Read