The Michigan Engineer News Center

Dimitra Panagou selected for NASA Early Career Faculty Program

Dr. Dimitra Panagou, Aerospace Engineering Assistant Professor, was selected to participate in NASA’s Early Career Faculty Program.| Short Read
EnlargePortrait of AERO Assistant Professor Dimitra Panagou. Photo: Joseph Xu, Michigan Engineering.
IMAGE:  AERO Assistant Professor Dimitra Panagou. Photo: Joseph Xu, Michigan Engineering.

Congratulations to Dr. Dimitra Panagou, Aerospace Engineering Assistant Professor, for her selection into the NASA Early Career Faculty Program for her proposal, “The AstroNet: A Human-Centric Network of Free Flying Space Co-Robots.”

NASA’s 2016 Early Career Faculty solicitation called for proposals from outstanding early career academics for “innovative, early-stage space technology research of high priority to NASA’s Mission Directorates.” As a recipient of this prestigious award, Dr. Panagou will receive $600,000 in funding over three years to develop foundational guidance, navigation and control (GNC) algorithms to empower human-robot collaboration in space. Specifically, she will leverage hardware currently on the International Space Station to develop a swarm of robots to assist astronauts during extra-vehicular walks.

For Dr. Panagou, this research represents a natural progression of her control theory expertise into space technologies. She has previously developed GNC algorithms for multi-agent autonomous marine, ground and aerial systems.

Please join us in celebrating Professor Panagou’s achievement! To learn more about her research, please visit Dr. Panagou’s faculty page.

Portrait of AERO Assistant Professor Dimitra Panagou. Photo: Joseph Xu, Michigan Engineering.
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Researchers
The electrons absorb laser light and set up “momentum combs” (the hills) spanning the energy valleys within the material (the red line). When the electrons have an energy allowed by the quantum mechanical structure of the material—and also touch the edge of the valley—they emit light. This is why some teeth of the combs are bright and some are dark. By measuring the emitted light and precisely locating its source, the research mapped out the energy valleys in a 2D crystal of tungsten diselenide. Credit: Markus Borsch, Quantum Science Theory Lab, University of Michigan.

Mapping quantum structures with light to unlock their capabilities

Rather than installing new “2D” semiconductors in devices to see what they can do, this new method puts them through their paces with lasers and light detectors. | Medium Read