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Lie detecting software

By studying videos from high-stakes court cases, University of Michigan researchers are building unique lie-detecting software based on real-world data.| Short Read

About this video

By studying videos from high-stakes court cases, University of Michigan researchers are building unique lie-detecting software based on real-world data. Their prototype considers both the speaker’s words and gestures, and unlike a polygraph, it doesn’t need to touch the subject in order to work. In experiments, it was up to 75 percent accurate in identifying who was being deceptive (as defined by trial outcomes), compared with humans’ scores of just above 50 percent. The system might one day be a helpful tool for security agents, juries and even mental health professionals.

About the Professor

Rada Mihalcea, professor of computer science and engineering, leads the Language and Information Technologies group (LIT@UNT). Her research interests are in Natural Language Processing, Machine Learning, and Information Retrieval. She is currently working on lexical semantics and graph-based algorithms for natural language processing.

Mihai Burzo, assistant professor of mechanical engineering at UM-Flint received his Ph.D. from Southern Methodist University, Dallas, TX. in 2001. His current research interests are infrared thermal imaging, thermal comfort and air diffuser design.

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Researchers

Reading cancer’s chemical clues

A nanoparticle-assisted optical imaging technique could one day read the chemical makeup of a tumor. | Medium Read