The Michigan Engineer News Center

Rising waters

With a rapidly growing populous of more than 28 million people, Jakarta can be looked at as a case study for the engineering challenges caused by climate change and rapid urbanization.| Short Read
EnlargeBoy jumping into dirty water with another boy and a woman in Jakarta
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Jakarta is experiencing land subsidence (sinking) of 1-15 cm per year. In the meantime, the sea level in Jakarta Bay increases as much as 0.57 cm per year. The sinking of the city perpetuates the flooding problem in Jakarta, with 40% of its territory already below sea level.

With a rapidly growing populous of more than 28 million people, Jakarta can be looked at as a case study for the engineering challenges caused by climate change and rapid urbanization. Combined with the fact that the city boasts the world’s most active Twitter concentration, the PetaJakarta.org project is on the leading edge of an emerging class of participatory data collection that has implications far beyond flooding.

The project is a template that can be used in global mega-cities like Shanghai, Dhaka, Mumbai, Bangkok, or even New York City.

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Boy jumping into dirty water with another boy and a woman in Jakarta
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The electrons absorb laser light and set up “momentum combs” (the hills) spanning the energy valleys within the material (the red line). When the electrons have an energy allowed by the quantum mechanical structure of the material—and also touch the edge of the valley—they emit light. This is why some teeth of the combs are bright and some are dark. By measuring the emitted light and precisely locating its source, the research mapped out the energy valleys in a 2D crystal of tungsten diselenide. Credit: Markus Borsch, Quantum Science Theory Lab, University of Michigan.

Mapping quantum structures with light to unlock their capabilities

Rather than installing new “2D” semiconductors in devices to see what they can do, this new method puts them through their paces with lasers and light detectors. | Medium Read