The Michigan Engineer News Center

Professor Olson writes about the Flint water crisis for The Conversation

Associate Professor Terese Olson recently wrote an article for The Conversation titled, “The science behind the Flint water crisis: corrosion of pipes, erosion of trust.”| Short Read

According to the article, “water quality issues in Flint began with the decision of city officials in 2014 to switch from buying treated drinking water from Detroit to treating Flint River water themselves using a city-owned treatment facility.”

Olson explains that of the possible sources for drinking water, rivers present the greatest treatment challenge.

“Because of Flint’s method of treating Flint River water, it experienced problems with elevated trihalomethanes, a regulated class of disinfection by-products that are known carcinogens. A domino series of causes and effects were responsible for this problem,” Olson continues in the article.

To read the article, please visit theconversation.com.

The Conversation US is an independent source of news and views from the academic and research community, delivered directly to the public.

The electrons absorb laser light and set up “momentum combs” (the hills) spanning the energy valleys within the material (the red line). When the electrons have an energy allowed by the quantum mechanical structure of the material—and also touch the edge of the valley—they emit light. This is why some teeth of the combs are bright and some are dark. By measuring the emitted light and precisely locating its source, the research mapped out the energy valleys in a 2D crystal of tungsten diselenide. Credit: Markus Borsch, Quantum Science Theory Lab, University of Michigan.

Mapping quantum structures with light to unlock their capabilities

Rather than installing new “2D” semiconductors in devices to see what they can do, this new method puts them through their paces with lasers and light detectors. | Medium Read