The Michigan Engineer News Center

Nicholas Kotov receives the UNESCO Medal

Nicholas Kotov, the Joseph B. and Florence V. Cejka Professor of Chemical Engineering Professor, received the UNESCO Medal for his work on biometric self-organization of nano colloids, ultra-strong nanocomposites, tissue engineering with nanomaterials, and nanoscale drugs.| Short Read

Nicholas Kotov, the Joseph B. and Florence V. Cejka Professor of Chemical Engineering Professor, received the UNESCO Medal for his work on biometric self-organization of nano colloids, ultra-strong nanocomposites, tissue engineering with nanomaterials, and nanoscale drugs. The medal was awarded during a ceremony held at the UNESCO headquarters in Paris on February 5, 2016.

“I was proud to represent the University of Michigan, the United States, and all of my students, postdocs, and colleagues who contributed to the research on self-organization of nanoparticles at UNESCO,” Kotov says.

This award, established in 2010, is presented each year by the Director-General of UNESCO to prominent scientists, public figures and organizations that contributed to the development of nanoscience and nanotechnologies. The award was created at the initiative of the International Commission responsible for developing the nanoscience and nanotechnologies theme for the Encyclopedia of Life Support Systems (EOLSS).

UNESCO’s Director General, Irina Bokova, presenting the medal to Kotov in photo above, says “this medal is designed to highlight the tremendous benefits of progress in nanoscience and nanotechnologies for our societies, for our economies, for all of us”

Kotov is also a faculty member in Biomedical Engineering, Materials Science & Engineering, and Macromolecular Science & Engineering

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The electrons absorb laser light and set up “momentum combs” (the hills) spanning the energy valleys within the material (the red line). When the electrons have an energy allowed by the quantum mechanical structure of the material—and also touch the edge of the valley—they emit light. This is why some teeth of the combs are bright and some are dark. By measuring the emitted light and precisely locating its source, the research mapped out the energy valleys in a 2D crystal of tungsten diselenide. Credit: Markus Borsch, Quantum Science Theory Lab, University of Michigan.

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