The Michigan Engineer News Center

Peretz Friedmann selected as the recipient of the 2016 Meir Hanin Int’l Memorial Prize

The Meir Hanin International Memorial Prize (M.H.I.M.P.) Committee awards the International Hanin Prize to honor prominent researchers from around the world.| Short Read
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IMAGE:  François-Xavier Bagnoud Professor Peretz Friedmann

The Meir Hanin International Memorial Prize (M.H.I.M.P.) Committee, at the Technion, announced that Dr. Peretz P. Friedmann, François-Xavier Bagnoud Professor, Aerospace Engineering, at the University of Michigan, as the 2016 winner of the International Hanin Prize.

The Hanin Prize is awarded to honor prominent researchers from any country around the world who have made substantial scientific and/or technological contributions to the advancement of aerospace sciences and have ties with the Technion. The Hanin Prize will be awarded to Dr. Friedmann in Israel, where he will give two lectures, one of which is the Hanin Memorial Lecture at the 56th Israel Annual Conference on Aerospace Sciences (IACAS), March 9-10, 2016 and the other at the Technion in the Faculty of Aerospace Engineering.

Click here to view Dr. Friedmann’s bio and awards.

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Researchers
The electrons absorb laser light and set up “momentum combs” (the hills) spanning the energy valleys within the material (the red line). When the electrons have an energy allowed by the quantum mechanical structure of the material—and also touch the edge of the valley—they emit light. This is why some teeth of the combs are bright and some are dark. By measuring the emitted light and precisely locating its source, the research mapped out the energy valleys in a 2D crystal of tungsten diselenide. Credit: Markus Borsch, Quantum Science Theory Lab, University of Michigan.

Mapping quantum structures with light to unlock their capabilities

Rather than installing new “2D” semiconductors in devices to see what they can do, this new method puts them through their paces with lasers and light detectors. | Medium Read