The Michigan Engineer News Center

Nadkarni gift invests in student entrepreneurs

Its purpose is to support student teams in junior/senior-level project-oriented courses in CSE in which students develop software and hardware prototypes, many of which have commercial potential.| Short Read

Shirish (BSE EE ’82) and Manisha Nadkarni, Medina, Washington, have made an expendable gift to be used at the discretion of the chair of the CSE Division of the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. Its purpose is to support student teams in junior/senior-level project-oriented courses in CSE in which students develop software and hardware prototypes, many of which have commercial potential. Some funds may be used to encourage student participation in conferences where students show prototypes that have commercial potential in order to get feedback from potential customers and investors.

Mr. Nadkarni is a serial technology entrepreneur who founded three companies in mobile email, social language learning and mobile shopping, two of which were acquired by Research in Motion and RosettaStone. “I had an opportunity to meet with student teams during a recent trip to University of Michigan and was impressed with their entrepreneurial spirit and the projects they were working on. My goal with this gift is to provide the added fuel and encouragement to help student teams reach the commercial potential that they seek”, said Mr. Nadkarni.

Jon Kinsey

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The electrons absorb laser light and set up “momentum combs” (the hills) spanning the energy valleys within the material (the red line). When the electrons have an energy allowed by the quantum mechanical structure of the material—and also touch the edge of the valley—they emit light. This is why some teeth of the combs are bright and some are dark. By measuring the emitted light and precisely locating its source, the research mapped out the energy valleys in a 2D crystal of tungsten diselenide. Credit: Markus Borsch, Quantum Science Theory Lab, University of Michigan.

Mapping quantum structures with light to unlock their capabilities

Rather than installing new “2D” semiconductors in devices to see what they can do, this new method puts them through their paces with lasers and light detectors. | Medium Read