The Michigan Engineer News Center

Two PhD students honored for nuclear fuel cycle research

Two U-M nuclear engineering PhD students have won 2015 Innovations in Fuel Cycle Research Awards, a program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Fuel Cycle Technologies.| Short Read

Two University of Michigan nuclear engineering PhD students have won 2015 Innovations in Fuel Cycle Research Awards, a program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Fuel Cycle Technologies.

Stephen Raiman claimed first place and a $3,000 prize in the Open Competition’s Advanced Fuels category. His award-winning research paper, “A Facility for Studying Irradiation Accelerated Corrosion in High Temperature Water,” was published in the Journal of Nuclear Materials in August 2014.

Matthew Marcath took second place in the Open Competition’s Material Protection, Control, and Accountancy category, claiming a $2,500 prize. His award-winning research paper, “An Implicit Correlation Method for Cross-Correlation Sampling, with MCNPX-PoliMi Validation,” was published in Nuclear Science and Engineering in June 2015.

The Innovations in Fuel Cycle Research Awards program supports college students who play an important role in developing breakthrough solutions and maintaining U.S. leadership in nuclear technologies.

This story was written by Connor Ullmann.

Portrait of Steven Winters

Contact

Steven Winters
Human Resources Generalist

Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences

(734) 764-4261

1902 Cooley

Metal rods that are part of the molecular epitaxy beam apparatus at Michigan Engineering. Photo by Joseph Xu, Michigan Engineering Communications & Marketing

Nanoparticles could spur better LEDs, invisibility cloaks

More efficient household LEDs and invisibility cloaking are two possible applications for a new process that adds metallic nanoparticles to semiconductors. | Medium Read