The Michigan Engineer News Center

Two students honored for nuclear fuel cycle research

Two U-M nuclear engineering doctoral students have won 2015 Innovations in Fuel Cycle Research Awards, a program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Fuel Cycle Technologies.| Short Read

Two University of Michigan nuclear engineering PhD students have won 2015 Innovations in Fuel Cycle Research Awards, a program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Fuel Cycle Technologies.

Stephen Raiman claimed first place and a $3,000 prize in the Open Competition’s Advanced Fuels category. His award-winning research paper, “A Facility for Studying Irradiation Accelerated Corrosion in High Temperature Water,” was published in the Journal of Nuclear Materials in August 2014.

Matthew Marcath took second place in the Open Competition’s Material Protection, Control, and Accountancy category, claiming a $2,500 prize. His award-winning research paper, “An Implicit Correlation Method for Cross-Correlation Sampling, with MCNPX-PoliMi Validation,” was published in Nuclear Science and Engineering in June 2015.

The Innovations in Fuel Cycle Research Awards program supports college students who play an important role in developing breakthrough solutions and maintaining U.S. leadership in nuclear technologies.

This story was written by Connor Ullmann.

Portrait of Steven Winters

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Steven Winters
Human Resources Generalist

Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences

(734) 764-4261

1902 Cooley

The electrons absorb laser light and set up “momentum combs” (the hills) spanning the energy valleys within the material (the red line). When the electrons have an energy allowed by the quantum mechanical structure of the material—and also touch the edge of the valley—they emit light. This is why some teeth of the combs are bright and some are dark. By measuring the emitted light and precisely locating its source, the research mapped out the energy valleys in a 2D crystal of tungsten diselenide. Credit: Markus Borsch, Quantum Science Theory Lab, University of Michigan.

Mapping quantum structures with light to unlock their capabilities

Rather than installing new “2D” semiconductors in devices to see what they can do, this new method puts them through their paces with lasers and light detectors. | Medium Read